Prince Harry, Meghan Markle move in service for Queen, which body language expert Louise Mahler called the “strangest thing”.

A body language expert has called a tiny movement by Prince Harry and Meghan, the Duchess of Sussex, during a service for the Queen as the “strangest thing I’ve ever seen”.

As Harry and Meghan held hands after leaving a solemn service at Westminster Hall on September 14, Louise Mahler told 7Life it was “strange” that the couple would “change the distance.”

WATCH THE VIDEO ABOVE: The body language expert opens up about Meghan and Harry’s move

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The Duke and Duchess of Sussex weren’t the only royals pictured holding hands at the end of the service – Princess Anne’s daughter Zara Phillips and her husband Mike Tindall did the same.

However, some on social media directed outrage at Meghan and Harry in particular, calling the move “inappropriate”.

Prince Harry and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, arrive at the Palace of Westminster after the procession. Recognition: WPA pool/Getty Images

Mahler even went so far as to say that holding hands – in this particular context – was “the strangest thing I’ve ever seen”.

“It was totally incongruent with everyone else, for the distancing and their placement, and I would have thought people wouldn’t hold hands in a situation like that,” Mahler said.

“The fact that they come together, change the distance, hold hands, is strange.”

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Other couples in front of Harry and Meghan, including the Prince and Princess of Wales and Prince Edward and Sophie, Countess of Wessex, were all seen at a certain distance.

Mahler questioned why the Sussexes often seemed to touch and support each other at public events.

“Harry puts his hand over Megan’s – I wonder if Harry has some unconscious need to hold her back in some way,” Mahler said.

“I’ve always thought it was protection, but the fact that it never changes tells me that maybe he’s holding her back in some way.”

Prince Harry, Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, Prince William and Catherine, Princess of Wales. Recognition: WPA pool/Getty Images

Mahler said she observed the same behavior when the Sussexes joined the Wales outside the gates of Windsor Castle on September 10.

Meghan “actually went through first,” she said, adding that Meghan went ahead of Harry.

“She shoots through all the time.

“So it’s a protection,” Mahler said of the contact between the two.

Queen Elizabeth’s children, grandchildren and their spouses are all expected to attend her funeral. Recognition: WPA pool/Getty Images

Mahler said when the Sussexes entered Westminster Hall for the service on September 14, they followed the same pattern – Meghan again entering “a little bit ahead” of Harry.

“You see, it’s unusual,” Mahler said.

Prince Harry and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex leave Westminster Hall on September 14, 2022. Recognition: WPA pool/Getty Images

Royal commentator Angela Mollard told The Morning Show that Harry and Meghan “broke no protocol” with the move.

“There’s no protocol for that,” Mollard said.

“In the past, members of the royal family were very dignified and very reserved, but they weren’t the only ones who held hands.

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“Zara and Mike Tindall came out holding hands.

“We know that Meghan and Harry are holding hands, which is very appealing to younger generations in particular.

“They are there to support each other. I don’t think we can criticize that.”

Social media has been wildly divided over the matter.

One tweet said: “What a shame. Meghan and Harry just had to draw attention to each other by holding hands. Totally inappropriate, but what else can you expect?”

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One response to that bold comment read, “Not sure if it’s actually inappropriate – but it was quite odd… like they were kids in need of support and not independent adults who would be able to fend for themselves.” to stand on your feet. ”

“Did I really see Meghan and Harry holding hands in Westminster? No decency,” said another.

Others defended the royals, tweeting: “She can’t even comfort her grieving husband without criticism.”

“All this nonsense about Harry and Meghan holding hands at today’s ceremony – two boys once had to walk behind their mother’s coffin in a public spectacle, it had to be traumatising, nobody was holding their hands at the time. Harry is very fortunate to have found someone to hold his hand through life,” argued another.

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Heartbreaking gesture

The solemnity and regimented order of the procession allowed no overt expression of sentiment among members of the royal family.

But when the Queen’s coffin arrived in Westminster to begin the waiting time, a small signal showed that there was heavy emotion in the building.

Members of the Royal Family are seen at the Palace of Westminster as the First Watch begins service while Queen Elizabeth II is in state. Recognition: Dan Kitwood/AP
An emotional Prince Harry at Westminster Hall. Recognition: Christopher Furlong/Getty Images

At one point during the Archbishop of Canterbury’s brief ministry, Harry seemed overwhelmed and raised his hand to his forehead in a heartbreaking gesture of sadness.

Harry and Meghan stood behind and at a distance from Prince William and his wife Kate, now the Prince and Princess of Wales.

The distance between us: William and Kate are ahead of Harry and Meghan. Recognition: Christopher Furlong/Getty Images
The Duke of Sussex, the Earl of Snowdon, the Duchess of Sussex, the Princess of Wales and the Prince of Wales follow the party carrying Queen Elizabeth II’s coffin into Westminster Hall. Recognition: Jacob King/ WPA Pool/Getty Images

King Charles III looked completely lost throughout the procession.

At his side was his Queen Consort Camilla, who had arrived in Westminster in a car with Kate.

Meghan arrived in a separate car with Sophie from Wessex.

Queen Consort Camilla and Catherine, Princess of Wales. Recognition: Daniel Leal/AP
Meghan, Duchess of Sussex and Sophie, Countess of Wessex. Recognition: Leon Neal/Getty Images

There was some speculation that all four women would arrive in one car to demonstrate unity, but it was not to be.

While the men and women of the royal family were bound by a common sentiment – sadness at the loss of Her Majesty – there still seemed to be an ocean of distance between them in some ways.

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